Issue 2

Issue 2 / 2008

Featuring: John Mulaa, Ph.D., Vusi Moloi, Jermaine Archer, Ph.D., Adjoa Acquaah-Harrison; an interview with Sobonfu Some; and poems by Otema Yirenkyi.

Set the Intention

Set the Intention

When we launched Africa Unbound three months ago, I knew that we were embarking on a journey with a serious purpose and meaningful contribution; I did not know, however, how our mission would be received. I am so grateful and humbled by the response that we have been receiving and the enthusiasm that is building around Africa Unbound. Your comments and offers to support the development of this forum have encouraged us and added fuel to our passion, and we look forward to serving you in greater ways.

How Sustainable is LDC’s Growth?

How Sustainable is LDC’s Growth?

The record rates of economic growth achieved by the Least Developed Countries (a group of 50 countries of which 35 are African, 8 Asian, and 7 island countries) in 2005 and 2006 were underpinned by a record level of exports – which was particularly associated with high commodity prices for oil and minerals – and record levels of capital inflows, particularly aid. 

The Emerging Governance Paradigm in Africa

The Emerging Governance Paradigm in Africa

John Mulaa, Ph.D.

Is conventional wisdom regarding governance in Africa about to undergo a fundamental change? A disputed electoral outcome in Kenya and a flagrant disregard of the election results in Zimbabwe have led to some very interesting outcomes.

The Organic Roots of the African Matrilineal Society

The Organic Roots of the African Matrilineal Society

Vusi Moloi

African societies have been inherently matrilineal in orientation since the beginning of time. The queens and powerful figures in their own right like Queen Nerfetiti of Egypt, Queen Makeda of Ethiopia, Queen Candace Amanirena of Nubia, the Rain Queen Modjaji and Queen Manthatisi of South Africa... corroborate this enduring social system that has defied the most impossible odds. This socio-cultural construct changed only with the introduction of Islam, Christianity, and the colonial conquest which imposed patriarchal rule.

Dreams in the African American Folk Tradition

Dreams in the African American Folk Tradition

Jermaine Archer, Ph.D.

In exploring the cultural connections between Africa and the antebellum South of what became the United States of America, slave narratives are among the most compelling sources for examining the slaves' remembrance of Africa. Expressions of cultural memory found in the narratives from both men and women of the 1800s suggest that despite the increase in an American-born population and an emerging African-American identity, African culture did not dissipate with each passing decade of the nineteenth century. In fact some of the more popular book length narratives of the antebellum period demonstrate the persistence of memory within the slave quarters.

Love is A Many Splendored Force

Love is A Many Splendored Force

In this column, I invite you to a front row seat as we explore the possibility that love can be a paradigm for national development and change. It is possible to jump to a one-dimensional concept of love because when cupid throws his arrow, who are we to quibble about the delights of kundalini and the sense of peace and understanding that flows through us? The one-dimensional packaging of love as just being about romance shortchanges our examination of other kinds of love, mainly unconditional love or Agape, which is needed for the healing of Africa.

Offering Your Gift to the World

Offering Your Gift to the World

Rahel Kassahun

In her warm and soothing voice, Sobonfu Somé urges us to remember what we have forgotten. She prays that we may realize what we are here on this planet to achieve. We need to start with a prayer, she says; otherwise, we may wander throughout our days without knowing our purpose and ultimately waste our life.

Eludes Me & Akwabaa

Eludes Me & Akwabaa

Life keeps eluding me.
Too many times my dreams refuse to come true for me.

Just when I'm ready to reap
When I've struggled and struggled and think I've arrived
The doors when I reach them
Say "closed" today.

Latest Comments

Ajayi Olutayo

Ajayi Olutayo

11. October, 2012 |

People like you are needed on this continent to take us to where we should be. Keep it up man!

Marcus Edibogi Akor

Marcus Edibogi Akor

11. October, 2012 |

Thanks for this powerful article. I am very glad I read it. Keep up your great work and remain Blessed Law!

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